Genes influence ability to read a person’s mind from their eyes

human eye

Our DNA influences our ability to read a person’s thoughts and emotions from looking at their eyes, suggests a new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Twenty years ago, a team of scientists at the University of Cambridge developed a test of ‘cognitive empathy’ called the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Test (or the Eyes Test, for short). This revealed that people can rapidly interpret what another person is thinking or feeling from looking at their eyes alone. It also showed that some of us are better at this than others, and that women on average score better on this test than men. Read more…

10 ways to use coffee in your cooking

espresso frosting

Every coffee lover eventually reaches the point where their morning mug just isn’t enough. If you’ve come to this stage, it’s time to start incorporating coffee into your everyday cooking. Not only will you enjoy the flavor, but you’ll also wring every last use out of your java! If you’re ready to get creative with your coffee, here are 10 great ideas.

1. Baked Desserts

Is there anything better than the taste of coffee and chocolate? The next time that you’re making cakes, brownies or doughnuts, add a splash of liquid coffee to your mixing bowl. The flavor will spread throughout the dessert while it bakes, and the result will be a heavenly union between chocolate and caffeine. Read more…

Nuclear weapons made from guinea pigs: Is there any truth to this?

Guinea pig

Whether we like them or not, most people see guinea pigs as cute, small, fluffy mammals, which kids usually take care as pets. However, there are reports circulating online saying that these tiny creatures are made into weapons of mass destruction. Is there any truth to such claims?

Why does it have to be guinea pigs? And can this type of weapon wipe out the existence of guinea pigs, worst, our own existence? Read more…

Johns Hopkins cancer diet hoax emails

Since 2004, millions of people have received emails titled “Johns Hopkins Cancer Diet” and “Johns Hopkins Update” claiming that the Johns Hopkins University private research hospital proclaims alternative methods for curing cancer. This is a hoax.

The emails usually start off with “This is an extremely good article. Everyone should read it. After years of telling people chemotherapy is the only way to try to eliminate cancer, Johns Hopkins is finally starting to tell you there is an alternative way.Read more…

Bad hair day?

Karl Nessler hair dryer

Having a bad hair day? Spare some thought for your great-grandparents because in their time it took about 10 hours to complete the process of waving hair to withstand washing, weather and time.

The advent of electricity sparked a major change in the concept of hairdressing when in London in 1906 the hairdresser Karl Nessler – who was called Charles Nestlé – invented the permanent-wave machine. Read more…

It’s time to regulate the gig economy

Technology is used to monitor workers doing platform-based work. It can also be used to regulate work and protect workers.

Over a century ago, labor laws began to be instituted in diverse countries throughout the world. These laws were intended to provide protection to workers in what was recognized as an unequal relationship of exchange, but it also gave authority to managers to organize and direct their employees’ work. Read more…

New stem cell method produces millions of human brain and muscle cells in days

Scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have created a new technique that simplifies the production of human brain and muscle cells – allowing millions of functional cells to be generated in just a few days.

Human pluripotent stem cells are ‘master cells’ that have the ability to develop into almost any type of tissue, including brain cells. They hold huge potential for studying human development and the impact of diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, and heart disease. Read more…

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